Educator, administrator, researcher, and advocate with expertise in U.S. politics & government, social movements, gender-based violence, and Title IX compliance.

Demonstrated experience effectively building coalitions and coordinating educational programs on justice and equity with student organizations, community groups, and political campaigns.

My fellow roundtable discussants and I (center) at the Annual Meeting of the Western Political Science Association held in San Diego, CA, in April 2019. Our topic: Teaching Environmental Politics Radically, from an anti-racist and anti-colonial perspective.

My fellow roundtable discussants and I (center) at the Annual Meeting of the Western Political Science Association held in San Diego, CA, in April 2019. Our topic: Teaching Environmental Politics Radically, from an anti-racist and anti-colonial perspective.

Research & Teaching Areas of Specialization

  • U.S. Politics and Government

  • Gender, Race, & Citizenship

  • Social Movements

  • Law & Social Change

  • American Political Thought

  • Qualitative & Quantitative Research Methods & Analysis

  • Public Policy

  • U.S. Presidency and Congress

  • Service-Learning and Applied Politics

Gathering with my fellow American Association of University Women (AAUW) postdoctoral research award winners in Chicago in 2016.

Gathering with my fellow American Association of University Women (AAUW) postdoctoral research award winners in Chicago in 2016.

My 2017 peer-reviewed article:

Rape, Apology, and the Business of Title IX Compliance

Politics, Groups, and Identities Vol. 5 , Issue 1, pgs. 182-196, 2017

Abstract

This essay discusses the body politics of the contemporary student anti-rape movement, using the widely publicized 2016 case of Stanford Olympic hopeful and convicted sexual predator Brock Turner as an analytical departure point. My objective is to place the raced and gendered discourses of the Stanford case in the broader political debate about the rape crisis and Title IX compliance in higher education. My reading of the Stanford case and the cultural commentary generated by the rape survivor’s letter suggests that students would be better served if university administrators (1) recognize that sexual assault has been normalized on their campuses, particularly in college athletics and fraternities, (2) acknowledge the dignity of student survivors of sexual violence by offering an institutional apology, and (3) initiate substantive cultural reforms that extend beyond Title IX legal compliance. Full article available here.